Camara has educated and provided digital literacy skills to hundreds of thousands of children in disadvantaged communities around the world. This would not be possible if not for the persistent efforts and dedication of our volunteers. This week is National Volunteering Week and we at Camara want to give a special thanks to those who have given up their time to provide a better life and education for those who need it most. We spoke to two of our own volunteers in our Kenya hub and asked them about their experience volunteering with Camara Education.

Camara Volunteer, Emily Kingi

Camara Volunteer, Emily Kingi

My name is Emily Kingi and I am 21years old. I am a trainer at Camara Education. I am mainly involved in Lead training in Skill builder and facilitation in Intel.

When I first joined Camara, I never thought of volunteering, neither was it ringing in my mind that I should, but after spending time with the Camara family, I came to like and admire what the other volunteers were doing to help the community and to empower knowledge to the teachers. This is what made me want to become one of the volunteers with Camara Education.

I am passionate about training because as days go by, I see the results right on time. Remember that the happiest people are not those getting more but those giving more.

Let me say that every training session that I get a chance to either facilitate or train is my favourite,because I so happen to enjoy every session especially when very many questions arise,it becomes more fun when we answer them as a group,building friendship and aswell creating a suitable environment for learning.

For those thinking of volunteering, I would just like them to know that it’s not about pay but passion, because the best antidote I know for worry is work. The best cure for weariness is the challenge of helping someone who is even more tired. Wherever you turn you can find someone who needs you. Even if it is a little thing, do something for which there’s no pay but the privilege of doing it.

One of the great ironies of life is this: He or she who serves almost always benefits more than he or she who is served and the best way to not feel hopeless is to get up and do something. Don’t wait for good things to happen to you.If you go out and make good things happen,you will fill the world with hope,you will fill yourself with hope.

Volunteers receiving their certifications. L-R, Peter Keah, Philip McAllister, Mohammad Abdulrahman

Volunteers receiving their certifications. L-R, Peter Keah, Philip McAllister, Mohammad Abdulrahman

My name is Mohammed Abdulrahman but mostly people know me by (Moh’d Bauss) I am 21 years old. I have been in Kenya for 4 years now.  I was born and raised in UAE (United Arab Emirates).

My role as a volunteer with Camara Education is as a technician.  It involves hardware and software maintenance, school dispatch and networking.

The reason why I chose to volunteer in Camara Education is I wanted a better understanding about different people, communities and organizations as well as to gain career experience and develop skills or learn new ones.  Finally I volunteer to give back to the community and make the world a better place.

Volunteer, Mohammad Abdulrahman performing maintenance duties in the Kenya hub.

Volunteer, Mohammad Abdulrahman performing maintenance duties in the Kenya hub.

I am passionate about the work Camara Education does. When you keep on visiting schools and see the kids improve their ICT skills it’s really wonderful.

I do have a lot of favourite moments volunteering with Camara Education. One of them being last month when we traveled to Uasin Gishu County where we dispatched over 500 computers and networked 36 schools. It was an amazing experience and you can truly see the joy in the children’s faces when they are greeted with this new technology.

So I implore everyone to find a cause and volunteer, because not only will you be helping others, you will be helping yourself as well.