Camara, the international charity and social enterprise which improves education in disadvantaged

 Camara Education celebrates 10th Anniversary and pledges to deliver digital literacy to two million children by the end of 2016 Camara, the international charity and social enterprise which improves education in disadvantaged communities around the world, celebrated today, Thursday 12th November, its 10th Anniversary with a pledge to deliver digital literacy to two million children by the end of 2016, pictured at the announcement were Tiffany Grace and Jerard John, both age 10 from St. Patricks National School, Chapelizod, Dublin. Pic. Robbie Reynolds


Tiffany Grace and Jerard John, both age 10 from St. Patricks National School, Chapelizod, Dublin. Pic. Robbie Reynolds

communities around the world, celebrated its 10th Anniversary yesterday with a pledge to deliver digital literacy to two million children by the end of 2016.

Speaking from Camara Education in Dublin’s Chapelizod, CEO, John Fitzsimons called upon organisations and individuals to support the next phase of Camara’s impact by contributing to the improvement of education and skills of children in disadvantaged communities all over the world, including, Ireland, Africa and Haiti.

Fitzsimons said: “This has been a momentous year for Camara, having exceeded our one millionth digitally literate child and reached our 10 year anniversary. We will continue working to provide children in disadvantaged communities with the platform to achieve their full potential and reach two million children by the end of 2016.”

To-date, Camara has provided 75,000 computers into schools around the world  including Gaelscoil Bharra in, Dublin and Corpus Christi National School, in Limerick, established 3,750 eLearning Centres, trained 20,000 teachers to use ICT and ultimately, provided digital literacy skills to over 1.4 million children. On its 10th birthday, the social enterprise paid tribute to the staff, volunteers and partners who helped the organisation reach this significant milestone and set out the organisation’s intent for the year ahead.

Governments and schools are realising that technology has to be prioritised in education or run the risk of

Camara makes a pledge to deliver digital literacy to two million children by the end of 2016, pictured at the announcement were from left to right: Carson Salinger, Matilda Hoelscher, Jerard John, Izabel Daly, Aidan O’Flaherty, Tiffany Grace and Clayton Griffin, all age 10 from St. Patricks National School, Chapelizod, Dublin. Pic. Robbie Reynolds

Camara makes a pledge to deliver digital literacy to two million children by the end of 2016, pictured at the announcement were from left to right: Carson Salinger, Matilda Hoelscher, Jerard John, Izabel Daly, Aidan O’Flaherty, Tiffany Grace and Clayton Griffin, all age 10 from St. Patricks National School, Chapelizod, Dublin. Pic. Robbie Reynolds

young people falling behind in today’s digital age.

With recent events such as the publication of the OECD report and the announcement of the new five year Digital Strategy for Schools in Ireland there has been much discussion on whether ICT is a help or hindrance in education. Based on ten years working in ICT in Education globally, Camara believes ICT must be used as a tool to improve education, so that the ICT-led transformation seen in so many sectors can be replicated in education. By prioritising technology in the classroom we can ensure a world class education for all and provide lifelong learning skills that will take students into the new digital era.

Camara is actively seeking new partnerships with Irish businesses, organisations and individuals to help them reach their target of two million digitally literate children by 2016.